Partitioning Problems

Usually during the installation of various distributions I tend to use the default partitioning tool. However in some distros either the tool works in a way that I don’t really like or, sometimes i have a problem to much the partitioning scheme in mind with the one that actually make. For example when I tried to make a multiboot system with Windows XP, Windows 7, Backtrack 4, Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring, OpenSuse 11 and Ubuntu 9.04 , the scheme I had in mind was, each Windows version on it’s own primary partition, the same going for Backtrack, and then a huge extended partition with 4 logical partitions inside, one for each distro and one for Swap. And it seemed to work fine actually, up to the point that OpenSuse installed itself on a primary partition (probably my fault that this happened but anyway), and so I was left with 4 primary partitions, one extended in the middle with Mandriva and the Swap, and a huge unallocated space at the end of my disk, in which I intended to install Ubuntu back I was unable. So I used the Gparted on the Ubuntu livecd to fix the partitions and I deleted the Opensuse one. But for some reason I was unable to resize the extended partition so I had to wipe out all the non-Windows partitions and make create them from scratch with Gparted, at least this way I was able to make the partitioning the way I wanted.

Now today I started my tries to get Gentoo installed, on the space I left after yesterdays ArchLinux Installation. Well the scheme was 1 primary partition for /boot and a huge extended after this including the root partition and the swap file of Arch and also the root partition and of Gentoo… however again I was unable to resize the extended which I created with ArchLinux’s partition editor. So again I wiped out almost all the disk and created the partitions from scratch… I guess I ‘ll have to reinstall ArchLinux again later, but now it will be easier… at least I will not repeat the same mistakes…

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